Children of the Night Bootleg

Professor Stone '95 Review 1

Trent Reznor and his bad boys are back onstage stateside, something many NINE INCH NAILS fans thought they'd never see in 1 9 9 5. All signs had pointed towards the band taking a well overdue break after touring the hind legs off their las album, the epic "Downward Spiral".

However, help was needed on the live circuit in the shape of one of Trent's long time heroes, the legendary Mr. David Bowie. The White Duke had suffered a somewhat fall from grace in the past ten years.

Once an innovator, but NOW relegated to the mainstream, Bowie was now relying on a comeback from the dead with his powerful new album, "Outside".

The music on this new Bowie epic was a far cry from the "Lets Dance" era of old. It owed plenty to his Berlin period of electricalwizardry in the late seventies and was dragged screaming into the nineties by the overwhelming influence of new bands like NINE INCH NAILS, Marilyn Manson, Ministry and their ilk. To fire up the resurrection of Bowie in 1995, a touring support was needed that would bring the kids back into the arenas and chance be it that though many may pay to see Nine Inch Nails as support, many would stay on to witness their first ever Bowie show. A wicked segue was planned so that Nine Inch Nails and Bowie would play together on the same stage prior to the start of Bowie solo set. Both artistes covered each others songs as Trent and his crew faded into the back-ground Bowies powerful band would take up the running with a no-holds-barred version of "Hallo Spaceboy". The tour was a total success and one that would be talked about for years to come. Bowie was completely on the same wavelength as Trent Reznor and the partnership was a marriage made in heaven, if only more established artists would drop the barriers and work together you would be promised concerts that really would be value for money. Lets just hope this is the first of many.

Professor Stone '95

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Nine Inch Nails
Nine Inch Nails
This article is provided courtesy Keith Duemling and Tracy Thompson from the collection previously located at SUS.